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Hybrid working benefits Disabled people, but risks poorer development opportunities

22 October 2021

Hybrid working benefits Disabled people, but risks poorer development opportunities

Nine out of ten workers don’t want to return to pre-Covid patterns, preferring working remotely for three days a week according to new research on making hybrid work inclusive.

The University of Lancaster research found that Disabled workers, women, parents and those with caring responsibilities are at risk of facing particular challenges when working remotely, due to isolation from the office and potentially missing out on opportunities for learning and development.

The study highlighted how line manager support for remote working is considered particularly important by Disabled workers, with 61% of Disabled workers indicating they felt comfortable asking for remote working because their line manager was supportive of it.

DR UK Head of Policy Fazilet Hadi said ”Working from home and working flexibly is welcomed by thousands of Disabled people. It allows us to avoid the challenges of public transport, better integrate work with health and personal issues and maintain our independence.

This research highlights that flexibility may have a negative impact on our career progression. Action needs to be taken to ensure this doesn’t happen.”

The University has developed a guide for employers which outlines the steps organisations can take to realise the full range of benefits while mitigating the risks presented through a transition to remote or hybrid work, as well as a briefing for policymakers.